Dominique O’Rourke
The 2019 Citizen Satisfaction Survey gap analysis shows that people are very satisfied with parks and trails and that this is an area for "secondary maintenance." While we want to maintain the service, this is a lower priority area-  for citizens and our strat plan - where we could slow down the replacement of playground equipment (PK0102 in the capital budget of $800,000)- especially as we complete the Parks and Recreation Master Plan and think about implementing the Older Adult Strategy. I also notice that grants are much lower on the parks and rec budget line than they were in 2018. [2018 grants: $497,829 and 2020 grants $96,848]. 

While the question was asked and answered on the capital budget board, what are the operational outcomes of slowing down playground replacement? Can staff suggest an option in this regard? How many parks are slated for replacement in 2020? What would happen if we did one or two fewer? 

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Dominique O’Rourke
gap analysis 2019 satisfaction.jpg My apologies, I meant to post this above. You can find the entire report in info items, November 8.
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wmcquade
Residents are satisfied with playground equipment because the City has a comprehensive replacement program. The Open Space Planning team has recently extended the replacement time from 15 years to 18 plus years. A further extension of the replacement timeline increases the risk of play equipment failure which results in increased operational costs. In some cases, full or partial removal of equipment without immediate replacement could occur to address compliance with safety standards.

Four playground equipment replacements are budgeted for 2020.
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